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business globally. when it does come to foreign policy, many of the public top goals are driven by domestic concerns. you can take that top concern and drill down a bit further. 50% of americans say the use of military drones make the u.s. safer from terrorism compared to only 31% who say the war in afghanistan has. surprise that most americans want the country to be the only military superpower. and more seat time -- see china as number one in economic straight -- in economic strength. while we are in asia, look at something else. more young americans think that region has greater importance for the europe -- for the u.s. than europe does, but not so for older americans. but in terms of america to other countries, this has not changed much overall. the pew research study chose 12 countries and ranked them in of who viewed america favorably. even if the u.s. is wanted to mind its own business on many issues, that is not a rally cry for isolationism. 77% say it is a good thing for the u.s. to have more involvement in the global economy. >> for more on the fascinating findings come i spoke a
was in american foreign policy. it really was like murder incorporated. the destruction of iraq, the creation of the cia black sites, the idea that the geneva convention was -- [inaudible] the abu ghraib torture, using guantanamo, you could go on and on in characterizing it. so i don't want to get into a thing about is obama worse than bush. i covered those wars, i know what happened. under president obama i think what we have is someone who has sort of rebranded some of the more egregious aspects of the bush-cheney counterterror apparatus and i think has convinced himself that they're waging a smarter war. so they're relying on the drones much more than the bush administration did, using small team of coovert operators to conduct either kill or capture, and because guantanamo remains open despite the president's pledge to close it during his anytime office, i think that the obama administration doesn't want to capture too many people. so the kill-capture program has generally become a kill program. and so at the end of the day, i think the enduring legacy for president obama on the issues i
the great society indeed and commitment that johnson had. because kennedy was essentially a foreign policy president. he used to say politics can ncj, but foreign policy can kill you. he would have gotten i think it would've run against barry goldwater, he would have won a big victory the way johnson it. he would have carried big majorities, democratic majorities into the house and senate i think. and i think he would've gotten the big tax cut, the federal aid to education, the medicare and the civil rights bills past. that would put them in the lead. the most, the rest of the 20th century presidential reformers, alongside of tr and wilson and even compared somewhat to fdr. i don't think he would have pushed beyond that. i think he would've pushed toward detente. i think we would have seen they don't earlier with kennedy family did with richard nixon, because that cuban missile crisis was so sobering, sobering for khrushchev, too. and then, of course, they made the nuclear test ban treaty which eliminated the pollution and radiation in the atmosphere, and i think kennedy saw this as an ope
in the less haft century. the poll found all-time low in public support for active u.s. foreign policy and growing desire to take a lower profile in the international arena. what do you make of this trend? >> three words, lack of trust. for the last three years this administration and this president in particular have not shown the rest of the world that we can be trusted. let's just take a look at three examples. israel, they were thrown under the bus at least a couple of times. when you spy on someone that's supposed to be your friend like germany, that raises concerns. and the other thing that i believe attributed to this is the fact that this president decided to pull troops out of iraq regardless of how you feel about us being there, we liberated iraq. but if you pull out too soon, that void is going to be filled by the same element that we went in there to destroy. so it's lack of trust that i believe that's causing americans to feel that we are not as well respected and, in fact, we are not. >> well, you know, the president campaigned for the white house back in 2008 he emphasiz
that leadership and what you remember then. congress had to lead america's foreign policy when it came to the issue of south africa. >> it was a very, very tough time. i got elected two months after ronald reagan vetoed the bill and when i met him at the white house that december, he and i got into a rather loud argument of discussion about why it was wrong. he ultimately relented because the senate would have its way. it was a tough fight. i got involved as a student with the movement and led as a member of the city council during which point mr. mandela found out about it and wrote me a short letter that said thank you so much for your support and in bold letters he said don't give up. i thought that was interesting because we didn't want him to give up. it's a tough way to go and to keep this in context. he was up against quite a bit as were the people of south africa. there were a number of determined people here, black, white, jewish who continued it work on behalf of his freedom. >> senator, we have you on not because you are a senator in the u.s. foreign relations committee, but
for that few years at the state department was best gift. >> the mix of foreign policy to describe her time in state and seem to all agree he was a more cautious secretary of state. but i think that can stem from a number of things. i think she by nature is a more cautious person and maybe thinking about 2016 and also could have been a lot of pressure from the administration to be cautious. i'm with luke, i think the american people have short term memories and b i don't think foreign policy is on their radar. if you look at things they care about, foreign policy is nowhere on that list. they only care with foreign policy as it connects to the economy. if anything, her time at state will benefit her. if you can picture her on the debate stage with chris christie, who doesn't have any foreign policy experience. if you look at it that way, i think it only benefits her. i think benghazi is not going to define her legacy long term. >> speaking of benghazi, there's something we need to compare, the two secretaries of state that preceded her, you find they had several ben gazdyes and it's worth n
so much. president obama in his typical foreign-policy challenges are being magnified by recent events in afghanistan. president hamid karzai refuses to sign a security agreement with the united states that would define american military presence in his country at the end of the year. but he did agree to a new agreement with iran. he agreed in principle to a friendship and cooperation path dealing with security and economic issues and within hours of that agreement, he was also already calling for the removal of american forces from the area. he said that we believe that all foreign forces should leave the region and the security of afghanistan should be handed over to people of the country. the so-called moderate has aalowed executions to surge since he took office, with more than 300 people executed since just the month of august. iran is the leader in executions. president obama and other dignitaries are on their way to south africa to attend tomorrow's memorial service from nelson mandela. hitching a ride on air force one with the president and michele obama, former presiden
particularly with of democrats. normally democrats who would give the president more foreign policy as sensitive as the diplomacy with iran has been. power to veto legislation. to the pentagon policy bill, that's going to be problem mattic. so, you know, the veto is out there, but if it's not a stand alone sanctions bill, they're a lot of work to do to convince congress and most importantly democrats not to join. thanks for getting up this and watching us on the washington journal. >> thank you for taking my call. i get my news is rt or press i'm an independent now. i used to be a die hard republican. but my priority has changed how the country changed to foreign policy. i thought obama -- even though i voted for the party at ron paul to ron republicans did paul at the convention was disgusting. the party because -- took over the republican party. that's a jewish movement. controls the foreign policy. is led by the nose by netanyahu and they were horrible. who's the biggest influence the white house outside of the political realm. >> strong opposition to iran at iran deal.o
. >> i think it's a result of several years now of a foreign policy that seems feckless. i mean you can start with resetting the relationship with russia right at the beginning of the administration. you look at the situation with china. looks hike we're almost involved in a growing confrontation over those islands but also all kinds of trade issues. then in the middle east, things are worse in syria, egypt, things are worse, certainly are worse in iran and in libya. i can't find a place where thens have gotten better since president obama's gotten into office, and i've just spent a lot of time in south america and we're not doing too much better there either. >> i thought it was embarrassing for the united states when president putin played almost the role of dad and rescued us from a military action but on the other hand the whole thing was kind of humiliating. >> the president created that for himself by drawing a red line, seems like seven or eight times that if they used chemical weapons, there were going to be serious consequences. and then he didn't seem to know what to do when a
the president's approval ratings are taking a hit on a whole host of issues. foreign policy; proval 38 percent. and immigration one of his other signature pieces and issues 35 percent approval. and federal budget that is carl cameron 32. and economy 38. and these are approval ratings. what is going on here? >> not surprising to be honest with you. once a president gets in the soup, all of the numbers have a way of coming down. combine that with the fact that people are not sure about the iran agreement and everything else, it is not a pretty picture. something happen today that may change the trajectory. >> which is what? >> i was those -- teasing you. >> the third quarter growth up to it 3.6 percent. i don't know if that were to hold but if it holds another quarter that could turn the president's fortunes around. >> that is one. michelle what about this? >> this is the first time since 1974 that majority of americans see this country as not powerful, as powerful as a decade ago. they are less respected and think that their country is not important on the global stage and the reason why is the
's foreign policy. >> this is the key statistic. with only a third on his foreign policy, harris, he's desperate for a deal. bottom line this week, we saw with biden in asia, he was unable to persuade the chinese to stand down in the east china sea. unable to get japan and korea working together. bottom line, the obama administration needs a deal. >> that's an interesting point. >> what they want is about -- it's all about appearance. it's not be substance or rereality. those numbers drive this president. >> you think he looked at those numbers? >> of course. that's all they do. >> you're side of the inside on this. >> i've never seen anything like the way they exercise -- we're in trouble, we make up something. we go out and talk about the income inequality. which i think is a real issue, which is an excuse for your program. remember, the reports record numbers of americans saying that we have lost influence in the world and less powerful than we've been. the depth on foreign policy disaster that the american people perceive of this president is staggering. >> it's not just obama wh
. and on foreign policy what he is doing with iran may be one of the most congress convertibsequ president has done for decades. >> for good or ill. >> and in a much more successful way than doing it by trying to invade countries. to say he has no more juice in him is premature. >> and -- >> but there is a book called "battle for the mind" you ring the bell and the dogs salivate. they associate with the that. one day the dogs were in the lab in cages and the river came up, flooded the lab. they almost couldn't get the dogs out. they freaked out and lost all their conditions but time passed and they became who they were again. they retrained them. one day as an experience, pavlov poured water under the door. the moment came right back. this is the kind of event for obama. we couldn't move george bush's numbers with anything we did unless we went back to the pile of rubble in 9/11. this is obama's pile of rubble. it's not for good. here was a guy -- >> you don't think he will overcome it. >> it will always be there. >> we have to take a break. #ac360later. >>> an 85-year-old american man taken off a
's the result of several years now of a foreign policy that seems feckless. i mean, you can start with resetting the relationship with russia right at the beginning of the administration. they reset it and it's much worse. you look at situation with china, looks like we are almost involved in a growing confrontation over those islands but also all kinds of trade issues. then the middle east, things that are worse in syria. things are worse in egypt. things are worse in certainly -- are worse in iran and libya. i can't find a place where things have gotten better since president obama has gotten into office. i have just spent a lot of time in south america. we're not doing too much better there, either. >> you know, i thought it was sort of humiliating for the united states in the issue over syria when president putin wrote a letter and sort of big footed president obama and sort of stepped in and played almost the role of dad and said i will take care of this. sort of rescued us from a military action. but, on the other hand, the whole thing was sort of humiliating. >> the president really creat
approach to foreign policy. our tenants of foreign policy have not changed we insist on our rice rite an rights and we t negotiate. this can be achieved best through construction gea negotiation. >> first of all, what has happened, nick, since this deal was made and are there signs of how this is going to work? >> yeah, john, i think their initial reaction is tentatively positive. iran has allowed inspects yors intinspectors intoa plutonium pl meet in sr sri sr sri vienna ane we going to implement this how are we going to ensure that the plutonium plant document get dot turned on and how can we ensure that the enrichment will be diluted enough but the initial signs are positive. >> why is arri nf going on this tour. >> we have talked a lot about israeli opposition to t to to t. israel is not the only country opposed to this deal sawe saudi arabia has quitely led opposition to the bomb. and there has been opposition between iran and saudi arabia. iran wants to say we are a regional super power and the u.s. has given us the capacity to enrich uranium and we are going to be here and we'r
-- american citizens take government officials who nor this reality when they pushed their foreign-policy agendas based on this. guest: thank you for your question and i disagree with your premise, which is that the world trade center was an inside job with explosives. there are the studies out there and it is pretty clear that the -- those buildings were attacked by planes that were hijacked by al qaeda operatives. i know there is a continuing conspiracy theory community out there that think this was some sort of nefarious scheme to -- it is hard to take of things seriously. i know you may genuinely believe it but i encourage you to go out there and engage in debates. i don't think the conspiracy theory holds any water. host: maurice from ohio, democrat's line. i have a question about -- let's sayear tomorrow they have a nuclear bomb. whatd of want to know would be the consequence, what the world would do about it as compared to pakistan having a nuclear bone, india having a nuclear bomb. what will the u.s. or the rest of the world do if iran says they have a nuclear bomb today? that is
the northeast. make a's dad is very excited rand u.s. foreign policy for years. [applause] you may be familiar with my dad's work to matt. he ran little league baseball. [applause] i was raised in the southern baptist church across the deep south and he of course was raised as a young marxist in the greater manhattan area. >> thank you very much. how many republicans voted for obama here? >> nobody's going to admit that. >> stand up. stand up. show yourself proudly. [applause] i didn't know anyone did that anymore. >> he used to ask that questions how many democrats and how many republicans? how many republicans voted for obama? me, a change. now they go to know. >> it's interesting because the republicans who voted for obama and the republican party itself there seems to be a lot of confusion and a lot of dissatisfaction and discouragement. you wrote this book for a number of reasons but my question is did you plan the timing of this book? >> yes i did. i'm going to drop this thing right before the republican party shinki in d.c. takes the beer truck strayed over the cliff with a government s
in the middle east. yearss a look at his 10 so far at the state department and the overall foreign-policy challenges that the obama administration faces. we will show all we can. is the policy director to talk about foreign policy challenges. welcome. they are reporting that they are talking about details. you concerns about the deal overall? guest: they are working out the devils of this plan. this is a line is deal we could have done a lot better. under that deal, the united states is starting to dismantle international sanctions. iran is not dismantling a single centrifuge. it is not starting to dismantle the heavywater reactor which a once called al plutonium bomb factory. sanctions andving spring of $7 billion to as much as $20 billion in the financial assets as well as exports after chemicals, the automobile industry and other things. bringing up a lot of money. it is not clear the concessions we got are really worth that. you have seen them move as early as last week. movement inno real terms of really constraining it, the sanctions might kick in. think they will bring this? >> par
and allowing, at the time, sort of which side of the barricade are you on type of foreign policy and you wonder what is the lesson now, right? what do you takeaway from what frankly where we are, american political culture was slow in many ways. where are we, you know, where are we today. where will we regret in 25 years that we were slow in not being on the right side of an issue or right side of history. >> what nelson mandela has said often when he was dealing with his own internal battles within the black coalition in the government as well as whites which is this idea there was a common purpose for south africa after he was released from south africa and when he came president. that's the kind of lesson that can be shared that transcends south africa in his time. where do countries, where do governments of all branches feel they are in it together and have a common purpose to solve problems, to advance freedom, to advance people from all background. i think that's one of the lessons that he already has given. i think it's amazing that chuck is right, i think he was viewed, mandela was in m
relations committee for 30 or 35 years, in the senate foreign policy was his biggest issue. he knows these subjects. he's have been experienced in them. he would be a good emissary. >> i think so. people tend to underestimate him this way. he does have the foreign policy experience. he's also very much a kind of one-on-one politician. what he's going over there to do is to defuse what is a toxic situation, and he's kind of the crisis manager. we've seen him perform this role -- >> i wouldn't say this in a way that's disrespectful. this should be handled at a lower pay grade. you may need the vice president to go talk to the chinese but to integrate a response from south korea and japan with the united states, that should be something that happens on the phone every day with lower level officials and it doesn't happen. >> it doesn't, and clearly this environment right now is very, very difficult. >> here's what he's trying to do. he's trying to send a powerful signal, the obama administration, to china and north korea. if you send a lower level person out there, that signal is going t
with a different type of foreign policy, a different approach of foreign policy. our tenant versus nos have not . he will insist on our rights. we will not compromise on the basic rights of our people. but the window of opportunity is a limited window. >> that was with iran's foreign minister. >>> alan gross was in north korea working on an internet project fo--incuba working on a. government. he was detained. libby casey has his story. >> alan gross' wife judy describes him as a man who wanted to help the world. >> he was very gregarious, very happy person, great personality, very, very warm. unfortunately, that's changed quite a bit in the past four years. people don't recognize him when they see pictures of him. >> decades of humanitarian work across the globe led the 60-year-old to cuba, the goal, setting up internet access for cuba's small jewish communities. now he languished in a jail cell. he has lost weight, his help, he feels like he has been forgotten and left to die. >> what could be worse than thinking your government isn't doing anything to bring you home. >> reporter: support
their foreign policy actually is. this is a perfect example where they have conflicting reports that confuse, oftentimes, our allies. when you come to foreign policy the most important thing you can do is have complete clarity. lou: administered by japan, as you certainly know well, for decades. and it is disputed territory in the sense that there are rich natural resources offshore. the chinese obviously want them. they're pretty important to our japanese allies as well. where does -- what is the smartest way to resolve this dispute? because it is certainly that. >> you are not going to completely resolve it because what you see is it is not just one area. china has been expanding their territorial claims. reseeded in the philippines. we see that the japanese. last year alone the japanese had to scramble their planes over 300 times because of chinese planes coming toward their territories. what we see in this particular situation, if we are going to try to attempt to stem and deal with it, the united states has to be very clear, have a strong presence because that is a very common in floods
and greet with castro. you don't want to be winging foreign policy, making big decisions at a funeral. however, away from cameras' grae glare, they might be able to get a word in. if obama can sneak it in without being taped doing it, he might try it. >> i heard a story from somebody in charge of white house security who was telling me about an event like this that provided an opportunity for a high-ranking u.s. official to meet with a u.s. enemy, but it did provide an opportunity that never would have been there before there was an opportunity for actual diplomacy. of course, on the other hand, as you pointed out, such things can be considered huge mistakes. there was the incident when president obama in 2009 was seen taking a picture, was taking a picture of him shaking hands hu. if cameras aren't around it might be with it. but if they are, to be avoided. >> exactly. you know, this is really a day where everybody's supposed to honor nelson mandela. i'm not sure it's a day of world foreign policy-making for nations. but as i mentioned, face time between world leaders is always benef
a diplomatic one. or as it was described to me at the time, we want to demilitarize our foreign policy, and you had a very forward-leaning point of view as it was perceived whereas hagel was seen as of a different view. first of all, is this assessment at all accurate? and second, what's happened in the ensuing months in terms of where they have gone on policies from iran to afghanistan as we were just discussing, does that, in fact, reflect this far more diplomatic and less military aapproach? >> i, i don't have a window into the president's decision making, but i, your explanation does not ring true to me, to my ears. i think chuck hagel has been close associate of president obama's since their time in the senate. of he served on the president's intelligence advisory board. i think there was a lot of discussion in the first term about finding a place for chuck hagel in the president's cabinet, and i think that that, you know, that discussion was naturally renewed when there was an opportunity to bring new people into the cabinet in the second term. so i think that is the president's, you know
you think, share your thoughts on obama foreign policy with other fox news sundayviewers on twitter at sundayviewers on twitter at #fns. this is the quicksilver cash back card from capil one. it's not the "limit the cash i earnvery month" card. it's not the "i only earn decent rewards at the gas station" card. it's the no-games, no-signing up, everyday-rewarding, kung-fu-fighting, silver-lightning-in-a-bottle, bringing-home-the-bacon cash back card. this is the quicksilver card from capital one. unlimited 1.5% cash back on eve purchase, everywhere, every single day. so ask yourself, what's in your wallet? >>> critics in this country and the middle east continue to question the nuclear deal the u.s. and its allies worked out with iran. and there is increasing concern about the new air defense zone that china has declared over disputed territory in the east china sea. joining me now to discuss this and more, former cia and nsa director michael hayden, and, general, welcome back to "fox news sunday." >> good morning, chris. >> do you look at the new six-month deal with iran as a rea
story. >>> we're going to come back with our roundtable. we'll talk a little about foreign policy, the challenges facing the u.s. overseas at the moment. iran, afghanistan just this . >>> here now, some of this week's images to remember. >>> i did love the guy on twitter pour me coffee who wrote, good job today, sports. >> i'm still shell shocked. >> we're not talking about any more reports because we're running out of time. but you're here with first read sunday. a lot to look forward to in the week ahead. surely they can get a budget deal with everything going so well on health care. >> on december 13, house republican paul ryan when it comes to the budget, nancy pelosi, they have to come up with a top line number that they're agreeing to saying in order to avoid a shutdown in january. remember, we ran out of funding in january, so december 13 is when they have to come up with this line, and i don't want to get into sequester and all these issues, but it has come to just this very small agreement. i think they will. democrats have a little leverage here, david, because republica
foreign policy, the challenges facing the u.s. overseas at the moment. iran, afghanistan just this weekend opportunities aren't always obvious. sometimes they just drop in. cme group can help you navigate risks and capture opportunities. we enable you to reach global markets and drive forward with broader possibilities. cme group: how the world advances. maestro of project management. baron of the build-out. you need a permit... to be this awesome. and from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. (aaron) purrrfect. (vo) meee-ow, business pro. meee-ow. go national. go like a pro. i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses even working part-time. where i work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportuni
under president obama. bill: 54-56% disapprove to how the president is handling foreign policy. 2/3 in that pew survey believe americans view greater involvement in the global economy is a greater thing. meaning when america is a strong country it's better for the world. >> we have seen that throughout history. and when we see economies like china coming up it's important to have our own economy keep going. people like to complain about america, but when something happens in the world, the philippines, the typhoon there, when something happens in the world guess who is the first country to go, the united states military and the charities. we are divide as a country on political lines. republicans and democrats are split on how they see our influence in the world. the democrats believe the president has broken his promises. he said we would leave iraq, afghanistan and close guantanamo bay. republicans are saying don't be apologizing for guantanamo bay when you are on foreign tour. bill: what do you think the apology tour did to our view of ourselves in the world? >> when you have t
and a strong presence on foreign policy than a senator from indiana. there was a global push for this from faith leaders and from anti-segregationists here in this country. we heard just now the secretary general of the united nations that no one has done more. no one in our era and generation has done more to fight discrimination than the moral leadership and example of this man who suffered for 27 years yet came out of prison with his wife winnie at his side and she has been imprisoned for 18 months at that time. in the anc, they came out of prison and marched in that march and from then on, his days in prison spoke of reconciliation. for that that he won the nobel prize and went on as he became. he helped sign into law the law that outlawed discrimination against the white minority. that belief in reconciliation that created a new south africa. that was a model for nations for people around the world. >> did he do it with kindness? >> he did it with love and with kindness and wit and humor. when he came here, he so impressed american presidents, we know how close he was with bill clinto
as the world director of the policy is to share am publisher of the journal of a speech writer and foreign policy adviser for'' well also the author of factive creation that received the harry s. truman book award. our friend tom brokaw will play a key role in this discussion in the future of liberalism. his career of one of the great american and light weight gretzky. [laughter] >> i can stand on skates but that is if. [laughter] >> he said he always skated to where the couple was going to be but tom brokaw had done that from generation to generation. he was as anchor and managing editor of "nbc nightly news." killed the man in the history of nbc to host the "today show" the night of the news did meet the press which is the york media circles that is the holy trinity. [laughter] the only american network acre in berlin at the collapse of sobol. it is not clear what happened. [laughter] he captured the sacrifices of the greatest generation quality that phrase it is generous and kind a and wise and a great man he played an invaluable role'' of all large swaths of american viewers. to be ste
performance suffered when asked about his handling about healthcare and foreign policy. >>> in for a change in the weather. let's go to our chief meteorologist bill martin. there will be no mistaking this change. >> big changes. this is a cold weather system. cold systems from the arctic don't hold a lot of water so we are not expecting any rain. may get snow in the mountains. highs today, 69 antioch. enjoy what you are looking at because we won't see numbers like that for a while. temperatures off a good 5, 10 degrees and they will continue to drop. this weather system as it works its way down from the land mass, front edge here, moves into the bay area over night into tomorrow and we will get cold air settling in. over night lows chilly but there is wind out there and cloud cover. it won't be as cold as it will be into wednesday and thursday morning when we see freeze warnings. tonight increasing clouds out there. you are noticing those as i speak. we had clouds. fog this morning. a live camera shot of the golden gate bridge, you see fog. clouds move in and as they do that will deposit s
in recent years. 51% say the president is not tough enough in his approach to foreign policy. ! you how one organization is playing this story on the pew study. you can get the details on the al jazeera met -- on the al jazeera website. then there is this based on your survey, 70% of those surveyed said the u.s. command less respect than it did in the past, matching little scene toward the end of president george w. bush's second term. that was something that was also surprising to us because we also conduct our global attitude studies all over the world. the image of the united states is negative all end ofe world by the george w. bush presidency, then at that .70% of americans say the u.s. was less respected around the world than it has been in the past. when barack obama came into office, we know that around the world u.s. relations improved. about 56% say this was the case in 2009 and in 2012. today it is back to 70%. likely --s are more in the credits have not changed it is not just partisanship driving. but there was a partisanship story there. host: what do we gather from all of that
have tried to be supportive. there have been various foreign- policy initiatives that i have not attacked him and try to be supportive of him on. on the drug issues, it has taken him a while, but he is now doing something about some of the minimums.bill in -- on infrastructure, there is a way that infrastructure only for the trip across america, we could have more infrastructure money is all the money earned overseas by american corporations, nearly $2 trillion from it could be brought home. andit at five % -- at 5%, probably hundreds of billions of dollars in money comes home, but justin tax revenue, at 5%, you would doubled the money we have available for infrastructure and if we could just tax it at 5%. win-win solution. we lowered the tax rate. we get more revenue and we build some roads. and i talked to the president about that, and the president cbo score is a loss of revenue because it is not coming in at 35%. 0% is coming home. we have to overcome the cbo score on this. i said, that's vote to overturn -- let's vote to overturn all the other roles, let's vote to overtu
. nobody had overturned a presidential veto on foreign policy in the 20th century. you had 37 and 53 republicans, including richard lugar who is still there. mitch mcconnell who said he was in college during civil rights movement and then he was on the side of civil rights and then it got all complicated with affirmative action and bussing and sanctions he said made it all clear again. he stood up again against the president. i was covering the white house then and occasionally they would bring in small groups of reporters to chat with the president on the theor theory w each other. it was during this period the president said more black people drive and own cars in south africa than there are cars in the soviet union and to him that sort of rationalized, this was, you know, communism is the evil system. and you had po to do everything to stand up to communism. i remember clearly he reached for two cookies and said he had half a sandwich for lunch. pat buchanon was a speech writer in the white house then. i recalled this memory to him. he said he wrote that lean. he got it from comme
can begin to do something about the income inequality in this country. >> let me switch to you foreign policy. secretary kerry met three hours with prime minister netanyahu. he's heading back to jerusalem for more private meetings with netanyahu. they agreed to disagree about the short-term iran deal. senator hutchison, his argument, kerry's argument, we still are keeping sanctions other than freezing assets. this will be better for israel in the long-term and we won't agree to a long-term deal that gives iran the ability to have a nuclear weapon. netanyahu's argument is there would be breakout capability. what do you think the secretary of state should be doing? >> i think you're seeing some of the effects right now whereas mr. netanyahu was going to stop putting settlements in the west bank. now that's been pulled back. i think israelis are very concerned about this. i think the concern i'm hearing also is when you have a carrot and you're offering something, you need to see that the other side is doing that before you give the relief from the sanctions. i think that is the criticism
. it was the first override of a presidential veto on a foreign policy issue in the century. and anti-apartheid leaders credit those sanctions and credit the private divestment movement around the united states and around the world with bringing about the pressure and the isolation that was necessary to eventually humble the apartheid regime. to humble the ruling south african government and bring them to the negotiations that eventually freed nelson mandela and brought him into the apartheid system. the fight here to do that was nothing compared to the fight in south africa, but politically, it was a he can of a fight here too. joining us now is former california congressman and former oakland mayor, ron dellums. he was the sponsor of the 1986 antiapartheid act. congressman dellums, nice to see you. thank you very much for being here. >> it's an honor to be here. i'm one of your great fans, my friend. >> well, thank you. tell me what led you to sponsor the antiapartheid act in the 1986? >> a little-known fact in history is that a group of african-american employees of the polaroid co
. more than half of americans also don't like the way he is handling foreign policy. immigration and the economy. the data now raising concerns over what can still be accomplished in his next few years as president. joining us now is our political panel angela mcgrewen, fox knew political analyst, and ronow molono. the president used to enjoy euphoric ratings. now his approval rating is abysmal on all kinds of issues. so ways happening overall? why is this happening? what kind of take do you look at this -- what prism do you look at this through, angela? >> the bottom line is this. are you better off today than you were four years ago? most americans that elected this president yet again, now they're having buyers remorse, because most americans are not better off. if you look at the unemployment rate at 7% but for the black community, last check, it was 13%. the hispanic community has not lowered that much and for women and young adults, if you have a college degree, kelly, most people don't have a job today, so people are looking at this situation and though the president is a
country. when he came to power, many wondered how he would steer the new country's foreign policy. after all the african national congress which he headed had been supported by the revolutionaries of the world. gadhafi, arafat, castro, but mandela knew what countries were in his best interests. he steered nit a pro democratic, pro western -- honoring his old comrades, never forgetting their support. his final act of greatness was leaving office. very few black african leaders had ever left office voluntarily in 1999 when nelson mandela did after just one term. he wanted to make sure that south african democracy didn't descend so -- he was in this sense south africa's george washington, as much as one man can shape's a country future, nelson mandela did it for south africa. and in doing so, he also shaped the consciousness of the entire world. let's get started. >>> let's go live to johannsberg to cnn's robin kernao. she joins us from outside his home in johannsberg, robin, there's a lot of talk about prayer and reflection. today's the day of prayer and reflection. there's lots of religi
would say the press was biassed against cheney. they didn't like his hawkish foreign policy and he was subject to more caricature than others. >> bill clinton probably feels he's been caricature. >> dick cheney didn't do a lot of media interviews. he worried about looking like he was in charge by being too public and that fed the image in a counter intuitive way. >> why did he talk to you. he has his own book out about his history of heart problems. designee spent a good amount of time with me. very generous with his time. i hope they believe his time sets the record straight for history much he was undefensive, very calm, he's got his point of view and he feels firmly about it. >> looking back as a guy that covered the bush administration and still covers the white house, how much did reporters know at the time about what was really going on behind closed doors or do we always have to wait for the books and for people to be out of office. >> my current theory is maybe we get 20%. >> 20%. >> of what's really getting on. we get large trust. elm missing a lot of what's going on. get
by giving speeches, what's the danger there? >> there was concern as he reached out in the foreign policy area. presidents send to do that. what is different about obama is that i think probably at least since fdr he has pushed the limits of executive authority on domestic matters to the limits. on immigration reform he's decided not to and all welfare laws, education, anti-drug laws, he has simply decided not to enforce divisions of the law and the biggest example is obama care where the employer mandate was delayed a year. if you like your insurance, you get to keep it well. turns out the law says, no, you can't. so he directed the state incidents to direct the insurance companies to go ahead and provide the same policies they had had before and also there's no subsidy provided for the federal exchanges as there is the state exchange and these are a lot of examples that more than any recent president has pushed his power to the limit, thus raising the question about whether he is upholding himself to faith fully execute the laws. >> the president has made an announcement, members of con
and foreign policy? he needs that trifecta. we are getting it with the economy. the iran deal. i think the other thing is who 2014 benefits. i'm not sure yet. when you listen to the focus group and others, parts and the sense that we have tried in one direction and another direction. where do we go from here? >> what was interesting, somebody said maybe we need an independent. when you play that out for everybody in that focus group, they came around and said i have to pick one party or the other. >> what has been the experience and raise people's hopes and the tea party, that was an experience of frustration by a lot of americans and some people who supported the tea party that is not what we were buying. that's the worst thing is people don't see a way out and feel powerless to affect their own government. >> those people don't vote? they said they were going to vote. >> most will. frustration needs to come up. the 2014 elections are in the same states. >> the federal elections. >> it's more severe. >> dan, fred, susan, thank you all. we will be back. i got my take away and the trivi
that consideration. you can't undermine foreign policy. it will give obama time to see the deal through if it works and maybe they can go back and revert and say maybe they don't need to do sanctions. >> it is a work in progress, fluid situation. when we come back, members of the right flank would have you believe happy holidays is an affront to the way of life. culture warriors battle war on christmas, millions of americans fight just to have a christmas. we will discuss. i do a lot oresearch on angie's list before i do any projects on my home. i love my contractor, and i am so thankful to angie's list for bringing us together. find out why more than two million members count on angie's list. angie's list -- reviews you can trust. for all those who sleep for all those who sleep too hot or too cool, now there's a solution. sleep number dual temp, the revolutionary temperature-balancing layer with active air technology that works on any mattress brand, including yours. it's only at a sleep number store, where this holiday season, the hottest sleep innovations make the coolest gifts - including sleep
. bret? >> domestically the administration has its hands full with obama care. on the foreign policy front, there is a potential bump in the road with iran sanctions in that there is a potential bipartisan deal in congress to move forward -- >> brett, right. we are hearing tonight that senator lindsey graham and several republicans joined by democratic senators, among them chuck schumer of new york, senior man in the democratic leadership, will hold a news conference on tuesday to announce they will introduce a bill that will apply more stringent sanctions on iran unless they meet a set of conditions within six months. far stronger than any imposed so far and would resemble the shape of what they hope will be the final outcome of the negotiation. if the negotiation don't get us there, these sanctions would take effect. >> that is embarrassing for the administration. >> it would be, if they say it strengthens the administration's hands. and the problem is these sanctions might easily pass the senate and if they pass the senate, they will almost certainly pass the house, forcing the pr
this foreign policy debates, very active in the discussion about vietnam, algeria, the soviet union. he also did something kind of interesting, he chaired a special committee to determine the five best senators in american history. this was a committee that lyndon johnson created for himself, grew tired of it, handed it off to ken kennedy -- kennedy. so this was in some sense the one project that kennedy was in charge of during his senate career. he took it very seriously, you know, inquired of all the great historians in the country and spent six, seven months really digging into this, came up with a list of the five greatest senators, and it was something that became part of his identity as being a young politician, but also someone very steeped in american history. so -- >> who came out at the top of that list? >> el, there was robert taft and robert concern. [inaudible] were the two 20th century ones. but the big ones were john calhoun, daniel webster, henry clay. the great triumvirate of the pre-civil war era. so kennedy's committee quickly decided on the top three, webster, clay, calho
to right, was the fact that the democrats vociferously opposed every step in the reagan foreign policy agenda that we now know empirically helped to bring down the soviet union. and that was both the issue of the nuclear -- resisting the freeze, the demonstrations in the street, the deployment of missiles to counter the soviet missiles that they had imposed in eastern europe, the reagan doctrine which helped reverse the terms of the cold war and, finally, the idea of the missile defense which has the one great advantage to us today and at the time so scared the soviets that it really led to their giving up on the race with us in the cold war. and realizing they had no chance of winning. which led to the most remarkable event of our lifetime, an event of biblical proportions, which was the collapse of the soviet union and the conquest of communism without a shot fired. and that was sort of the core of the 980s -- 1980s, that is what history will remember the '80s for. and again, as i say, i write in the introduction of the book in trying to trace my evolution from left to right that was
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